Stan Lee Marvel Comics

The Incredible Hulk #1 - The Strangest Man Of All Time! by Stan Lee  Marvel Comics
The Incredible Hulk #1 - The Strangest Man Of All Time! by Stan Lee  Marvel Comics
The Incredible Hulk #152 - Who Will Judge The Hulk? by Stan Lee  Marvel Comics
The Incredible Hulk #152 - Who Will Judge The Hulk? by Stan Lee  Marvel Comics
The Incredible Hulk #307 by Stan Lee  Marvel Comics
The Incredible Hulk #307 by Stan Lee  Marvel Comics
The Amazing Spider-Man #1 - Spider-Man Meets The Fantastic Four by Stan Lee  Marvel Comics
The Amazing Spider-Man #1 - Spider-Man Meets The Fantastic Four by Stan Lee  Marvel Comics
The Amazing Spider-Man #100 - The Spider Or The Man? by Stan Lee  Marvel Comics
The Avengers #1 - Earths Mightiest Super Heroes by Stan Lee  Marvel Comics
The Avengers #1 - Earths Mightiest Super Heroes by Stan Lee  Marvel Comics
The Avengers #58 -  The Avengers Assemble by Stan Lee  Marvel Comics
The Mighty Avengers #67 - Die, Avengers Die! by Stan Lee  Marvel Comics
The Incredible Hulk Portfolio - Paper by Stan Lee  Marvel Comics
The darling of geeky kids with superhero fixations founded in their youth, Stan Lee is a giant of the graphic comic book world. If you were to reel off any of the big budget superhero action movies of the past decade or so, Iron Man, The Fantastic Four, The Hulk, the Spider-Man series’, then you’ll find the man behind these original comic book novels and superhero heavyweights themselves, was none other than the much celebrated, Stan Lee.

Born in New York City in 1922 (New York’s instantly recognisable skyline has served as the cityscape for most of Lee’s comic book stories down the years), Lee worked his way up through the ranks at Timely Comics Group very quickly, since joining the company as a 17 year old. By 1941 he was working on the 3rd issue of Captain America, and yet 12 months later he was promoted to Editor at the same firm. In 1972 Lee became both Editorial Director and publisher of Marvel.

One of the predominant things that marks out a Stan Lee-created superhero from the chasing pack (or DC Comics as they were more commonly referred to), was that he insisted that his characters wouldn’t be having sidekicks. They might have fellow team members as such, but they wouldn’t have an annoying foil. Like a Robin to Batman for instance. There was just no place for this in a Stan Lee novel. And unlike, let’s say, Superman (another DC Comics character), Lee had objections to men wearing capes too.

With these parameters established, Lee set about naming his creations. Characters like Peter Parker and Sue Storm are so-called due to his poor memory, according to the great man himself. His understanding was that if he gave his primary players alliterate names (whilst in non-alter ego guise), he’d be able to recall them easier during the course of script writing. These were unremarkable people you’d pass by completely unawares on the street level, Lee’s hesitant superheroes when not moonlighting as crime fighters are ordinary, law-abiding citizens suckered into their alternative world and called upon to utilize their inhuman powers for the cause. Normally working in the field of sciences when they’re not restoring law and order, Lee’s superheroes tend to be of a highly intelligent breed.

Lee often chooses to let his stories send out contemporary social messages too, with the X-Men being a valid point in question, tackling discrimination in its purest form. And should Lee’s name appear on film credits as the creator of any of the superheroes in a particular movie adaptation of the comic book novels, then he has it written into the contracts that he must make a cameo appearance in said film if he so chooses. Which is why superhero film buffs will have noticed him as a bit part player in X-Men, Spider-Man 1,2 and 3, Daredevil, Hulk, Fantastic 4 and Iron Man during the 2000s.

The home of Batman, Superman, Wonder Woman and Flash Gordon, DC Comics, approached Lee after he retired from Marvel, enquiring as to whether or not he’d like to write a different take on their famous superhero creations. Which of course he did, as a limited edition series entitled, ‘Just Imagine’.

View All Art Works By Stan Lee Marvel Comics