Derrick Fielding

Tenby Harbour by Derrick Fielding
Brrr, It's Cold!!! by Derrick Fielding
Freeze & Quackers by Derrick Fielding
Return Of The Lakes Lovers by Derrick Fielding
Return Of The Lakes Lovers by Derrick Fielding
The Winter Woollies Collection by Derrick Fielding
The Winter Woollies Collection by Derrick Fielding
Crispy Duck With Winter Veg by Derrick Fielding
Crispy Duck With Winter Veg by Derrick Fielding
Derrick Fielding has a thing for snow. He must do. Why else would nearly all of his contemporary landscapes (with a fantasy-like graphic quality to them) depict snow scenes if he didn’t? Having said that, his back catalogue is peppered with less snowy ones, which illustratively allude to other seasons to be fair. But they are mostly snow-based. Snow, sorry, we mean, SO now we’ve established that the hugely popular Fielding typically paints snowy landscapes we can divulge a little more about the Liverpool-born artist. Like for example he habitually keeps a sketch pad and pencils on his bedside table (as opposed to a book, a framed photo of his nearest and dearest and/or his teeth in a glass), should he envisage his next (probably snow-filled) compositional masterpiece whilst giving it the old Zzzzzzz’s. Although Fielding clarifies that it’s normally during that time when he’s drifting off toward slumber that his light bulb-pinging moment arrives. And that unless he reaches for his art essentials then and there, then there’s a risk that THAT dream image might be lost forever in the mists of time.
Speaking of mists and time, there’s a distinctly other worldly quality and visual ambience to Fielding’s trademark pieces which is aided and abetted by his penchant for snowy themes. Did we mention the snow? Just checking. The all-consuming sense of mystery (yet never foreboding) in Fielding’s acrylic on boxed canvas paintings are pictorially amplified by the recurrent presence of footprints (in the snow, obviously) and long (sometimes creepy-ish) shadows cast in the shape of something far more glancingly sinister than what the owner of such shadows actually are. Here’s a clue; traditionally sheep, rabbits and ducks. Yet trees are also well represented in Fielding’s tour de artistic forces and admittedly can initially come across as a tad spooky. Quirky. Now there’s a better descriptive word for Fielding’s creative reveals. Quirky contemporary landscapes. Filled with all manner of wild animals, birds, cattle, trees and snow. And another unique feature of Fielding’s hallmark work is that he always continues the surface imagery around the sides of his boxed canvases which he fervently believes brings his work to life.
Anyway, born on Merseyside back in 1965, Fielding was a comic book addict as a child, with his title of choice being The Beano. And he fondly recalls landing himself in trouble with the express intention of being scolded and sent to bed early with a flea in his ear and the latest instalment from The Bash Street Kids in his Beano-encompassing hand. Method in his perceived mad/naughtiness it would appear. Aside from his childish antics, whilst growing up Fielding quickly developed a passion for art, as well as conceiving elaborate games for him and his school friends to play thanks to his colourful imagination. What with Fielding’s father being a painter and decorator during his son and aspiring artist’s formative years, Fielding junior had a never ending supply of rolls of wallpaper to plunder for his creative pleasure/peer entertainment. Despite the fact that said rolls of wallpaper were earmarked for his dad’s customer base. The fun you can have with wallpaper rolls though, seriously.
Fielding’s family home was perched on the outer reaches of Liverpool’s sprawling metropolis, so the expanse of the countryside was a mere bike ride away for him and his adventure-seeking friends. And in turn this evolved from riding around nearby rural lanes and paths to full-scale cycling holidays in the company of friends. Yet as Fielding suggests, you get to see so much more of the scenery which you otherwise pass through as pace in a car. Which of course meant Fielding would notice/commit to sketchbook that much more as a result. So in the fullness of time, Fielding’s chosen art forms would move away from his depictions of Beano characters like Lord Snooty, Dennis the Menace and Minnie the Minx and game creations on the back of wallpaper rolls and on to scenes of landscapes and spectacular open vistas.
Fielding’s extra-curricular artistic impressions were also replicated during his secondary schooling, which was duly observed by teachers; so perhaps it came as a surprise when on leaving school Fielding opted to go straight into a related industry/training rather than further his creative education at art school as was perhaps expected. Either way, Fielding started out in the professional world of employment in the capacity of a trainee sign writer at the nearby Aintree Racecourse; and of course familiar to most as the scene of the annual Grand National meeting. During this passage of time Fielding received a grounding in a more graphical style and functionality of painting, complete with almost animated visual hints, which have naturally filtered through into the compositional work in which he’s since gone on to gain a reputation for. Also Fielding continued to paint for himself in his spare time, normally watercolours based around the city’s famous historical and maritime-based architectural delights, of which there was plenty to choose. And these compositions inevitably found favour with family and friends who purchased them off Fielding.
Such was the popularity for his local scenes and vistas amongst his network of friends and colleagues that Fielding thought he might be on to something, from a more commercial perspective, so in 1999 he bode farewell to the sign-writing industry and decided to go it alone. Armed with as much a business head on his shoulders as well as the tried and tested creative one, Fielding launched his bespoke gift business which in the flesh, or rather, the paint, was a framed presentation of a Liverpool street along with the names of street’s inhabitants to add that personal touch. This concept caught on, and in no time at all Fielding was receiving a local business award for his idea, as well as another for his unique football-based board game too. The world might not have been his oyster at that juncture, but it seemed that Merseyside was well within Fielding’s grasp.
Fielding continued in this more commercial vein for the following few years, however it was only on marrying his wife in 2005 – and her actively encouraging her husband to go for it – that Fielding decided to make a go of his more personal, further-reaching and more whimsical style of art which he’d nurtured behind the scenes. Fielding knew deep down that he had to make inroads much further afield than his native Liverpool if he was to realise his long-held artistic dreams, so with that in mind and inspired by the confidence that his new wife afforded him, Fielding approached fine art publishers with his contemporary style of painting, courting many of the UK’s leading exponents, before eventually striking a deal with Washington Green. From there on in, Fielding and his art went from strength to strength as his individual works and collections were exposed to brand new audiences far and wide; resulting in where he is today – with his compositions remaining much in demand.

View All Art Works By Derrick Fielding